How do you get motivated when you are not feeling like doing the task in front of you?

Rose James
I use my performance statements to direct me in decision making as well as to strengthen my resolve. It reinforces where I want my life to be so I should do my very best to model my performance statement to live in accordance with my life goals.

Silja Moll
I remind myself how good.i feel when I complete the task. If feel unmotivated due to time limitations I remind myself doing part instead.of none is always better

Alexa Curtis
I put it aside for a while. Then come back to it. Sometimes it will take me a while to complete and that's fine tomorrow is a new day😂

Kathy Ellis
Depends, I don't always succeed but when I do it's usually with the things I already have a routine of doing… It helps the less you postpone it. I know that sometimes it feels hard right from the start, but it will even get harder with each time you delay it… Im not sure but usually it's just trying with as least as talk with myself as that usually takes me of the task itself… Just do it

Vernon Coleman
I think about the results. It is difficult but it’s something you have to build within yourself throughout time if this makes sense. I might fail some days but I will keep the objective in mind and compensate on others.

Line Mercier
First of all, I acknowledge myself for having showed up for the task. Because that is necessary in the first place for the task to be done. What then helps me is, to first start journaling. To have an honest conversation with myself. I allow myself to not like the task. I get everything out, as ugly it may be. And then I ask myself the question: Why did I agree to do the task? What kind of purpose does the result of the task serve? What else is there that I can learn from the task in front of me? Also, maybe: What is needed for the task to be more fun for me? What are the first 1-3 steps of that task?
Also, it helps me to use the Fabulous Feature of "Focus for 45min", especially with tasks, where it is not clear to me how to do them. So, instead of trying to finish them now, I allow myself to explore them for at least 30-45 minutes. And then, I let them go. So, distinguishing between tasks that are clear in steps, and tasks where I don't know yet, how much work they are, also helps me to be more at ease with them.
For example, writing an invoice to a client. This is not a task that I enjoy doing. The whole process of logging into our invoicing system (which is not user friendly at all) and gathering and filing all receipts and hours I worked that project for the client, is neither fun, nor appealing to me. But when I do my journaling, I remember why I am doing this. How greatful I am to have done work that I love and to get payed for it. And that the money from our client enables us to live the way we live, it enables us also to turn down clients where we don't feel a good match. So, doing the bookkeeping and invoicing, even though, I don't like that task, gives me the freedom to choose what kind of work I do and who I work together with.
Also, the process is quite clear. I just have to follow the checklist that I have created by now (Thank you, Fabulous Team, for also using Checklists! It trains me to look for more checklist opportunities in my work, so that I don't have to think about a recurring process any more.)