How do you stay focused for long periods of time? And how can you maximize studying absorption?

Maxime Le gall
Coffee does help focus the mind. Please don’t abuse it. Taking frequent brisk walks to increase circulation is helpful too. ‘Rosemary for remembrance ‘ an essential oil on cotton ball sniffed while you study and dabbed on your wrists for exams will help you recall the studied information.

Nino Fontai
A great question. Thinking about it… I’d say I had to want to study it. If it’s a subject I don’t care about I have to work the process. If it’s something I love, I go down the rabbit hole and don’t come back for hours.

First… for me it depends on what I’m studying and from what source. If it’s school studying, I would do the following:

Read assignment and take notes on it. Real notes on paper. Not just highlighting passages. Or jotting things in margins. The act of distilling the assignment and putting it in writing help me remember it.

Attend the lecture. Take written notes again.

Get home and combine my book notes with my lecture notes. Keep all three.

Start all homework assignments when assigned. Do not wait til last minute. Go to professor during office hours with questions.

If it isa language class or any other where it would work, make flash cards and study often.

Do optional assignments or readings.

I have modified the same sort of things for learning things for work where possible.

Yes… it takes time. Mostly it takes a desire to really know whatever it is.

In terms of focusing on work… deadlines focus me if the project doesn’t. I really hate missing them. If it’s something I love I get so involved I forget to eat etc.

If you have something that you have to learn that you’re really not interested in. The only help I’ve found is looking at why I’m studying whatever it is and focusing on that if it’s something I want.

Leonard Rodriquez
I stay focused for a long period of time because I make my goals and objectives clear, eliminating the chances of me giving up before all tasks are done and all goals are met.

For concentration, I usually listen to podcasts or Storytimes on YouTube because it helps me stay focused for an extend period of time.

Noel Barros
I really like to use the pomodoro technique (chunks of 25min and rest another 5min) it seems less to now you only have 25min to go instead of 1,2,3,4,5,6 hours… it also helps to start or do things.

Julie Andersen
I like to put on instrumental music as to not distract me. And then I start by focusing or studying a smaller less important subject, so I can get in a good zone to take on the bigger, more important information.

Caitlin Thomas
The key is in the first few minutes. I find for most people (and I am a teacher) that if you can focus for the first 2-3 minutes then you can focus for extended periods of time. As with anything, the more you practice the easier it gets. But in the beginning just focus on making that first 2-3 minutes entirely focused. Say to yourself before you start ‘I’m going to study and only study.’
In terms of absorption, teaching someone else is the best method for retaining information, but beyond that everybody is different. There are online quizzes you can do to find out which kind of learner you are, but some ideas to get you started are summarising chapters into a fixed number of sentences, reading the title/introduction and spending a little time trying to predict what may come up in the following passage, and turning important info into a song.
Each individual is different so try lots of things, persevere, and see which one works for you. Then tell your friends!

Ernestine Grabowski
I listen to a playlist called “Brain Food” on Spotify which plays high-energy synth wave music. This helps me zone out the distractions around me and focus on my work.

Maël Fournier
I have a paper to write quick thoughts that I want/need to get back later.
I keep the phone as far as possible. I keep a glass of water near by. I pee before starting. And for longer periods I keep some snack also nearby.

Britney Carlson
w̫e̫l̫l̫…… p̫e̫r̫s̫o̫n̫a̫l̫l̫y̫, i̫t̫'s̫ n̫o̫t̫ a̫l̫w̫a̫y̫s̫ t̫o̫ k̫e̫e̫p̫ t̫h̫e̫ s̫a̫m̫e̫ e̫n̫e̫r̫g̫y̫ e̫v̫e̫r̫y̫d̫a̫y̫ d̫e̫a̫l̫i̫n̫g̫ w̫i̫t̫h̫ f̫i̫b̫r̫o̫m̫y̫a̫l̫g̫i̫a̫, h̫o̫w̫e̫v̫e̫r̫, i̫ t̫h̫i̫n̫k̫ a̫b̫o̫u̫t̫ m̫y̫ f̫u̫t̫u̫r̫e̫ a̫n̫d̫ i̫t̫'s̫ u̫s̫u̫a̫l̫l̫y̫ m̫y̫ m̫o̫t̫i̫v̫a̫t̫i̫o̫n̫! t̫h̫e̫ s̫t̫u̫d̫y̫i̫n̫g̫ c̫o̫m̫e̫s̫ e̫a̫s̫y̫, i̫ h̫a̫v̫e̫ e̫v̫e̫r̫y̫t̫h̫i̫n̫g̫ i̫ n̫e̫e̫d̫ o̫n̫ m̫y̫ p̫h̫o̫n̫e̫ a̫n̫d̫ c̫o̫m̫p̫u̫t̫e̫r̫ t̫o̫ k̫e̫e̫p̫ m̫e̫ g̫o̫i̫n̫g̫, w̫i̫t̫h̫ n̫o̫t̫i̫f̫i̫c̫a̫t̫i̫o̫n̫s̫ o̫n̫ i̫n̫ t̫h̫e̫ s̫e̫t̫t̫i̫n̫g̫s̫ a̫s̫ a̫ r̫e̫m̫i̫n̫d̫e̫r̫