What kind of obstacles are you facing?

Tilde Hansen
Myself. I'm my biggest obstacle. With my mental health issues it's hard to keep myself motivated. My lack of a sense of self worth drags me down quite a lot and it's one of the things I'm hoping to slowly address using this app program and other strategies.

Emmi Heidt
That's a really vague question, but I guess I can give it sort of an answer. The main thing that I worry about is my multiple sclerosis. It's unpredictable and it's really hard to tell what will affect it and what that will look like. Will eating junk food trigger a relapse that will make it harder to walk? Or harder to do my job? Will going to bed really late for a walk trigger a relapse that will make me ask my parents for help with basic tasks? It's a really stressful thing to think about too much, but at the same time, if I'm not constantly aware of the potential consequences of the small choices I make every day to bolster my health, I run the risk of stressing my body to the point of relapse. And specifically with exercise, sometimes it's really hard to muster up motivation given that two months from now, there abilities I'm gaining might be taken away from me by my own brain. Like, what's the point of training to lift weights if next month I might be having trouble with carrying a cup of tea across a room, you know? But I'm trying to learn to approach exercise with goals relating to the journey rather than the destination. For example right now, I'm really enjoying improving my push up form and having a short exercise to do every morning helps me with motivation and energy.

Amy Fox
That's a really vague question, but I guess I can give it sort of an answer. The main thing that I worry about is my multiple sclerosis. It's unpredictable and it's really hard to tell what will affect it and what that will look like. Will eating junk food trigger a relapse that will make it harder to walk? Or harder to do my job? Will going to bed really late for a walk trigger a relapse that will make me ask my parents for help with basic tasks? It's a really stressful thing to think about too much, but at the same time, if I'm not constantly aware of the potential consequences of the small choices I make every day to bolster my health, I run the risk of stressing my body to the point of relapse. And specifically with exercise, sometimes it's really hard to muster up motivation given that two months from now, there abilities I'm gaining might be taken away from me by my own brain. Like, what's the point of training to lift weights if next month I might be having trouble with carrying a cup of tea across a room, you know? But I'm trying to learn to approach exercise with goals relating to the journey rather than the destination. For example right now, I'm really enjoying improving my push up form and having a short exercise to do every morning helps me with motivation and energy.

Victoria Andersen
Consistance and regularity some days I do everything with my new habits and few days later I lost motivation or don’t find the time to do it – I neglect for few days

Marilou Masson
About how to keep persistent on doing progress. Sometimes there's just another schedule that I have to do and most of the time it makes me lost track of the progress.

Edouard Deschamps
That's a really vague question, but I guess I can give it sort of an answer. The main thing that I worry about is my multiple sclerosis. It's unpredictable and it's really hard to tell what will affect it and what that will look like. Will eating junk food trigger a relapse that will make it harder to walk? Or harder to do my job? Will going to bed really late for a walk trigger a relapse that will make me ask my parents for help with basic tasks? It's a really stressful thing to think about too much, but at the same time, if I'm not constantly aware of the potential consequences of the small choices I make every day to bolster my health, I run the risk of stressing my body to the point of relapse. And specifically with exercise, sometimes it's really hard to muster up motivation given that two months from now, there abilities I'm gaining might be taken away from me by my own brain. Like, what's the point of training to lift weights if next month I might be having trouble with carrying a cup of tea across a room, you know? But I'm trying to learn to approach exercise with goals relating to the journey rather than the destination. For example right now, I'm really enjoying improving my push up form and having a short exercise to do every morning helps me with motivation and energy.

Uschi Lindemann
Consistance and regularity some days I do everything with my new habits and few days later I lost motivation or don’t find the time to do it – I neglect for few days

Brice Nunes
Hello, I think a smoothie is a good way to have a pprtion of fruit you need daily and starting with a sugary drink for energy levels.

Emy Richard
Well I’m trying to figure out what I want to do with my life. I want to get healthier and better at making decisions. I need to learn how to use my time better. I need to cook more at home. If I get one part of my life on track it should all fall into place.

Caroline Ortiz
It's hard to stick to plan when suddenly something happens. For example you suddenly decide to go out with friends and since you haven't planned for it, you don't know what to do with your self growth plans.

Kyle Banks
Consistance and regularity some days I do everything with my new habits and few days later I lost motivation or don’t find the time to do it – I neglect for few days

Vicki Lewis
That's a really vague question, but I guess I can give it sort of an answer. The main thing that I worry about is my multiple sclerosis. It's unpredictable and it's really hard to tell what will affect it and what that will look like. Will eating junk food trigger a relapse that will make it harder to walk? Or harder to do my job? Will going to bed really late for a walk trigger a relapse that will make me ask my parents for help with basic tasks? It's a really stressful thing to think about too much, but at the same time, if I'm not constantly aware of the potential consequences of the small choices I make every day to bolster my health, I run the risk of stressing my body to the point of relapse. And specifically with exercise, sometimes it's really hard to muster up motivation given that two months from now, there abilities I'm gaining might be taken away from me by my own brain. Like, what's the point of training to lift weights if next month I might be having trouble with carrying a cup of tea across a room, you know? But I'm trying to learn to approach exercise with goals relating to the journey rather than the destination. For example right now, I'm really enjoying improving my push up form and having a short exercise to do every morning helps me with motivation and energy.

Emil Jensen
Consistance and regularity some days I do everything with my new habits and few days later I lost motivation or don’t find the time to do it – I neglect for few days